INVITED SPEAKERS

International 


Dr. Charissa Patricelli is a Family Physician with a Fellowship in Addiction Medicine, and over 30 years of experience in healthcare.  She is the Director of Perinatal Addictions at BC Women’s Hospital and Medical Director of the FIR (Families in Recovery) program, the inpatient perinatal stabilization unit at BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.  FIR is an international leader in providing obstetrical, medical, harm reduction, stabilization and recovery oriented care for pregnant and newly delivered women who are cared for with a mother-baby dyad togetherness model, along with Eat Sleep Console (ESC). Dr. Patricelli has been a leader in the development and integration of an enhanced model of care for mothers and newborns impacted by substance use disorder. 

Dr Deborah Harris is Aotearoa/ New Zealand’s first Nurse Practitioner. Deborah’s research interests include the management of babies at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia and their later development.  The impact of her teams research has changed the treatment for millions of babies and families across the developed world.  More recently, Deborah has been investigating the prevention and management of neonatal hypoglycaemia within the Pacific Islands.   Current projects: ◾The Glucose in Well Babies (GLOW) Study. ACTRN number: ACTRN12615000986572 ◾The Glucose in Well Babies and their later Neurodevelopment (GLOWiNg) Study ◾The Pepi Splint Project


National 

Professor Christo­pher Bar­nett has dual fel­low­ships in neonatal/​perinatal med­i­cine, clin­i­cal genet­ics and is the head of the Pae­di­atric and Repro­duc­tive Genet­ics Unit at the Wom­en’s and Chil­dren’s Hos­pi­tal in Ade­laide. He is the lead of the NHM­RC fund­ed Genom­ic Autop­sy Project and on the expert advi­so­ry com­mit­tee of the Genomics Health Futures Mis­sion. Christo­pher trained at the Wom­en’s and Chil­dren’s Hos­pi­tal in Ade­laide and at The Hos­pi­tal for Sick Chil­dren in Toron­to. He has research inter­ests in pre­na­tal genet­ics, fetal pathol­o­gy and rare child­hood diseases.